General Images

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Explaining radial velocity
The true motion (pink) of a star can be decomposed into two components: a radial velocity along the line of sight (red) and a proper motion along the celestial sphere.
Credit: The RAVE Collaboration
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RAVE targets cartoon 
Cartoon edge-on view of our Galaxy and volume probed by RAVE, colour-coded by the azimuthal velocity map of the RAVE targets (Kordopatis et al., 2013 MNRAS). The maximum distances probed by the Gaia-ESO survey are also indicated, for comparison purposes.
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RAVE Sky Coverage DR4
Stellar heliocentric radial velocities, plotted over an image of the Milky Way, using the observations from the internal Data Release 4. Date: 2013.
Credit: The RAVE Collaboration; background image by Axel Mellinger (2000)
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RAVE Sky Coverage
Stellar heliocentric radial velocities, plotted over an image of the Milky Way. Date: 2009.
Credit: The RAVE Collaboration; background image by Axel Mellinger (2000)
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RAVE-ing in the Southern Sky 
The red line divides the northern and southern equatorial hemispheres at declination = 0 degrees. The blue fields of view are
part of the first data release from RAVE (Feb. 2006).
Credit: The RAVE Collaboration